Woodland Vole

The eyes are small; the ears short and nearly hidden by the fur surrounding them. Characters useful in distinguishing this species from other Adirondack voles include fur color and texture, and tail length. The back and sides are auburn or chestnut; the throat, belly and feet are gray to buffy gray. The tail is about 25 mm (1.0 in) in length, slightly longer than the hind foot. Bog lemmings have shorter tails and shaggy fur; the other voles have longer tails.

A diminutive harvest mouse like R. montanus, but upperparts deep brown or gray, heavily mixed with black, especially on the mid-dorsal area; ears blackish all over rather than dark at the base and light at the tip; tail about as long as head and body, the dark dorsal and light ventral stripes about equal in width. Continue reading »

Zimmerman Pine Moth

The eyes are small; the ears short and nearly hidden by the fur surrounding them. Characters useful in distinguishing this species from other Adirondack voles include fur color and texture, and tail length. The back and sides are auburn or chestnut; the throat, belly and feet are gray to buffy gray. The tail is about 25 mm (1.0 in) in length, slightly longer than the hind foot. Bog lemmings have shorter tails and shaggy fur; the other voles have longer tails.

A diminutive harvest mouse like R. montanus, but upperparts deep brown or gray, heavily mixed with black, especially on the mid-dorsal area; ears blackish all over rather than dark at the base and light at the tip; tail about as long as head and body, the dark dorsal and light ventral stripes about equal in width. Continue reading »

Gypsy Moth

Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar L.) is the most serious insect pest of hardwood trees in United states. In the 80 and 90, the gypsy moth defoliated more than a million acres each year in the eastern. Infestations alternate between years of little defoliation followed by periods of 2 to 4 years of heavier defoliation when gypsy moth populations are heavier. Of late infestations have been considerably reduced.

Gypsy moth caterpillars feed on most hardwood trees, except ash. They prefer oak, poplar, gray birch and fruit trees. When half grown or larger, the larvae are also likely to feed on evergreens. Continue reading »

Snake flies

Snake flies are insects in the family Raphidiidae. Snakeflies, sometimes called camel-flies, are distinguished by their long necks. They are predators of small arthropods. Larvae live in leaf litter and eat aphids or other prey. Snakeflies have two pairs of membranous wings that are folded over the abdomen at rest. Females have a long tube at the end of the abdomen, an ovipositer, for laying eggs.

Snakeflies occasionally inhabit various areas of houses by accident, but mostly live outside on trees. Though seldom seen, these insects are common in wooded areas, usually in association with bark. Continue reading »

Phorid fly

Phorid flies are about 1/16 to 1/8 inch long, dark brown to almost black, and move in a characteristic short, nervous, jerky manner. The largest segment of the hind leg is distinctly flattened laterally.

phorids are usually most common in late summer and early fall cropping. Tthe flies are attracted to light, and swarm near windows and doors in growing rooms and packing sheds. It is a common sight to see numbers of dead phorid flies on the floor beneath windows and near doors. Continue reading »